Sessions

Hakomi Assisted Self-Discovery

Structural Integration (also known as Rolfing/Hellerwork) is a method comprising a series of 10 sessions. It works systematically to restore space and movement in the body where it is less than optimal. Our body is designed to adapt to repetitive use, this means that embedded patterns of use that no longer serve their purpose can be undone, but it takes time, and repetition of new patterns.

The primary goal of Structural Integration is to show the body that new patterns of movement are possible and then give self-care strategies that support and encourage these.

Therapeutic Bodywork

A focus on working with long-term chronic issues/conditions, to reduce the unnecessary impact they are having on daily life. These issues/conditions includes a spectrum from ‘simply’ relieving work and life stresses to working with Parkinson’s, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, etc.

Back Pain
Headaches
Whiplash
Pelvic Pain
Neck Pain
Sports Injuries
Chronic Pain
Disc Problems
Migraines
Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
Neurological Dysfunction
Fibromyalgia
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Adhesions
Carpal Tunnel
Jaw Pain (TMJ)
Painful Scars
Scoliosis

A variety of techniques/methods often in combination so that if one approach is not as effective as desired then there are others to draw on. These methods include:

  • Myofascial Release (MFR)
  • Neuromuscular Techniques (NMT)
  • Muscle Energy Techniques (MET)
  • Positional Release Techniques (PRT)

Mark is a little cautious about using the word ‘treatment’ and how this implies he is doing the thing that makes the difference, when in reality it is your system’s response to treatment that is the healing.

Structural Integration

Structural Integration (also known as Rolfing/Hellerwork) is a method comprising a series of 10 sessions. It works systematically to restore space and movement in the body where it is less than optimal. Our body is designed to adapt to repetitive use, this means that embedded patterns of use that no longer serve their purpose can be undone, but it takes time, and repetition of new patterns.

The primary goal of Structural Integration is to show the body that new patterns of movement are possible and then give self-care strategies that support and encourage these.